Lakes and Volcanoes – Argentina & Chile’s epic scenery

Every time I come to write this blog, I feel like I’m falling further behind! Mind you, the internet has been pretty bad throughout most of South America so far – but more to the point, we’ve just been so busy there’s been no time to worry about the blog! But I know how much I’ll appreciate it at the end, and the internet in La Paz is slightly better. We’ve now crossed the halfway point of our journey… so I’m going to try and catch up as quickly as I can.

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Stunning views of Bariloche’s Lake Gutierrez

For almost three weeks (encompassing the post below), we’ve been criss-crossing between Chile and Argentina – I now have more stamps in my passport than I can count! But it’s been incredible to see the differences between the two countries and cultures, and how all the miles we’ve done on the truck have brought us to some pretty incredible places.

Take Bariloche, Argentina. In the middle of the ‘Lake District’ of Argentina, this is where Obama paid a visit not too long ago! It’s a strange town, with a real Swiss/German influence – likely from the influx of immigrants post-WW2. There are log cabins and fondue restaurants, along with chocolate shops galore! Since we arrived on Easter Sunday, we found the chocolate shops packed to the brim. Yum.

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I also took the opportunity to do a bit of horseback riding in Bariloche. While originally we had planned to go to a real estancia, they were too full and we had to switch to a more scenic (but less authentic) ride out by Lake Gutierrez. I did a full day’s riding and we saw some truly spectacular scenery. I can see why the Argentinians chose to bring the POTUS out here!

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Also, the steak… the steak in Bariloche was the best I’ve had in Argentina. We loved the parrilla El Boliche de Alberto – where the focus is solely on the meat. We maybe ordered a token salad… but didn’t eat much of it!

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A more traditional Patagonia parrilla, with roast lamb!

From Bariloche, we crossed over to Pucon, Chile. This little town had an entirely different vibe – dominated, of course, by the giant volcano Villaricca in the near-distance. This was a town devoted to adventure, and we knew we were in for a big one from the moment we heard the warning sirens blaring throughout town – signalling the volcano was active.

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Stunning volcanic sunrise before the long trek ahead

Now, if you’ve been following my blog adventures, you’ll know that we did a really hard trek in southern Chile called the W-trek. But even that didn’t quite prepare us for the volcano hike! The volcano was four hours of strictly UP hill. We did get to cut an hour off our journey by taking a chairlift, but it still wasn’t enough to make the journey easy! About half-way up the volcano, we strapped on crampons and used ice-picks to climb the permanent glacier that coats the top (and, in the winter time, it gets turned into a ski resort!) This made walking even more difficult.

When we were about twenty minutes from the top, we stopped to take off the crampons and switch to our gas masks. Now, I’m not going to lie… I almost didn’t make those last twenty minutes. It was HARD going. But I pushed through… and was rewarded with one of the most amazing views. Seeing a volcano bubbling with red-hot molten lava, magma swirling and bursting in front of us, leaping easily 100 feet into the air – it was the definition of EPIC.

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It was also tough to be up there. The air stank of sulphur – thank goodness for those gas masks – and breathing was difficult enough at that high altitude. The wind howled around us, threatening to push us over the edge. But the volcano had only started being that active two days before our arrival, so we were incredibly lucky with our timing. I can’t imagine getting to the top and only being greeted with that sulphurous wind!

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The way down… I wish I could say it was easier than going up, but it definitely wasn’t! Much harder on the joints. Most of the time, you’re able to sledge down the glaciers, but there wasn’t enough soft snow for us to do that safely. We were able to sort of slide down the gravel, but it threw up so much dust that it became difficult to see.

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Gas mask chic… but we made it

Still, it was one of the most rewarding days of the trip so far, and I wouldn’t have changed the experience for the world – even the next two days of aching legs!

 

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